• Instructions

    Working Creatively with the Three Exposure Controls: ISO

    Shot with ISO 3200 I will start this part a little different from the two previous parts, with a disclaimer and a little history. The disclaimer is in regards to the technical aspect of ISO, which I won’t delve into, since this is a basic introduction to ISO, and how to use it creatively as part of your photography, not an attempt on a technical explanation of how ISO works. A little history. ISO is referring to the “film speed standard”, and is a combination of two older standards known as ASA and DIN. This was a standard for the measurement of the sensitivity of film used in the analog…

  • Instructions

    Working Creatively with the Three Exposure Controls: Aperture

    The aperture is found in the lens, and helps control two aspects, a) how much light enters through the lens to the sensor (or the film for analog cameras), as well as the depht of the area in focus. The aperture is the actual hole, which size is controlled by the aperture blades. The size of the aperture is defined in what is known as “f-stops”, with the lower the f-stop number defining the wider or more open the aperture is, whereas the higher the f-stop number is, the smaller the aperture is. For example, f/4 is more wide open than f/8. The range of f-stops is typically found in…

  • Instructions

    Working Creatively with the Three Exposure Controls: Shutter Speed

    The shutter speed control regulates how fast the shutter curtain will open and close. For most lower end cameras the shutter speed can be regulated in full stops of light from 1/4000 of a second to 15 seconds or even 30 seconds. However, higher end cameras have as fast as 1/8000 of a second, and mirrorless typically can go as fast as 1/32000 of a second with the electronic shutter feature. The technical details of this are not so important here, what we should understand is that the shutter speed regulates two things: how much or little light we allow into the sensor, and how much motion we allow into…

  • Instructions

    Working Creatively with the Three Exposure Controls – Introduction

    I have been asked about how to get better at taking photos, or rather, how to handle the camera better. I love that question, because it allows people to improve the way they are thinking with their camera, instead of just taking snapshots of random moments. I always try to explain to people how to use the three exposure controls as the basis for their improvement and better familiarity with their camera. The shutter speed, the aperture, and the ISO. These three controls help the photographer to make the right exposure, so the subject on the photo becomes clear and bright enough to see. Each of them can be adjusted…

  • Instructions

    How to Exposure

    Exposure in photography is what defines how bright or dark a photo is. It is the amount of light allowed into the sensor, within a certain amount of time (usually defined in milliseconds or seconds). It is often compared to a bucket and rain, that is, the size and wideness of a bucket, vs. how long it rains into the bucket vs. how much rains falls at a given moment. The wider the bucket, the more rain can fall in it at any given moment, the longer it is allowed to rain into the bucket, the longer the rain will be poured into the bucket, and the stronger the downfall…